animation

No, I don’t speak Korean.

…but I often wish I did. Especially when I’m doing a “script adapting” job like the one I did last week. When I tell people I’m working on something like this “adapting an animated feature from Korea” into English, they assume I’m some sort of multi-lingual genius.

I’m not.

What happens is this: I get a copy of the film in the original language (with ‘visible timecode’ burned into the picture) along with a script (actually a huge Excel document) that includes the dialogue in usually poorly translated English, along with the ‘in’ and ‘out’ points of each line of dialogue.  I have to make sure those in & out points are accurate (to within one frame ) and then I have to re-write what the character is saying so that it matches the ‘lip flap’ seen on the screen AND makes sense plot-wise and character-wise… all while ‘American-izing’ slang and metaphors and whatever else might not make sense to a Western audience. If it sounds tedious to you, I can promise you that it is not. At least not to me. It does, however, require patience and a whole lot of time. It often takes an hour to ‘adapt’ just one or two minutes of dialogue, but for some reason I find it to be enjoyable work – rewriting not just by the line or word, but by the syllable… and of course trying to slip in some good jokes along the way.

 

Tipang_screengrab

Go Animate

When I look back on this strange year of 2009, at least I’ll be able to say I didn’t sit around doing nothing. This modern media landscape is, in many ways, stranger and more challenging than the old way(s) of doing business… but on the plus side we have more tools to generate our own work and (potentially anyway) get it seen by the world. Soooo, in addition to all of the scripts, books, monologues and improv shows, I have also started pecking away at some ideas to take advantage of the goanimate.com website.

Bud Fallbrook

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